Latest Tweets:

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ted:

You can’t go a day in New York without seeing something really weird. Illustrator Bruce McCall takes that one step further with his playful New Yorker covers. He illustrates the wacky realities of life in the Big Apple… and lovingly makes it weirder than it is.

Learn more about urban absurdism and other serious nonsense»

I need another week of summer, I’m not ready for this whole school thing yet

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kaylanewell:

slight work, august 2014
mixed media on paper, 7 1/2” x 5 1/2”

kaylanewell:

slight work, august 2014

mixed media on paper, 7 1/2” x 5 1/2”

(via mandorkus)

thefeministme:

VIA: Emma Watson’s Twitter

thefeministme:

VIA: Emma Watson’s Twitter

(via yayfeminism)

(via mandorkus)

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npr:

NPR’s Michel Martin was invited by St. Louis Public Radio to moderate an intensely emotional community conversation around race, police tactics and leadership.

Rev. Willis Johnson, the pastor of Wellspring Church, hosted a community conversation Thursday night that drew about 200 people to the church. In welcoming the audience, Johnson acknowledged he’s “gone from feeling hurt, to wanting to hurt,” but he said he hoped the event would be a step to healing a “community in trauma.”

Plea To Ferguson’s Leaders: To Help Heal, Acknowledge Our Hurt

Photo credit: Whitney Curtis for NPR

humansofnewyork:

"What’s the most important thing your dad has ever taught you?""If someone hurts your feelings, don’t worry, because that person will also have a turn to get their feelings hurt. And also, you should never undermine people or make them feel unimportant. And also, if you drop out of school, he won’t deal with you anymore."(Kampala, Uganda

humansofnewyork:

"What’s the most important thing your dad has ever taught you?"
"If someone hurts your feelings, don’t worry, because that person will also have a turn to get their feelings hurt. And also, you should never undermine people or make them feel unimportant. And also, if you drop out of school, he won’t deal with you anymore."

(Kampala, Uganda

sarahtopz:

ethiopienne:

b-case:

"the oppression of women knows no ethnic nor racial boundaries, true, but that does not mean it is identical within those boundaries.” 
 - audre lorde, “an open letter to mary daly”

free PDF here.

Holy shit this is dope! This book is out of print and expensive.  So glad to see it online for free!

sarahtopz:

ethiopienne:

b-case:

"the oppression of women knows no ethnic nor racial boundaries, true, but that does not mean it is identical within those boundaries.”

 - audre lorde, “an open letter to mary daly”

free PDF here.

Holy shit this is dope! This book is out of print and expensive.  So glad to see it online for free!

(via communistwomanifesto)

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"I think you make three films in the course of making one movie. You write a film that you think is going to be the movie you make; then you shoot another film and that’s the movie. But actually the only movie is the third one that comes from the editing process."

Ira Sachs

We spoke to the Love is Strange filmmaker about storytelling, indie film and more

(via tribecafilm)

(Source: tribecafilm.com, via tribecafilm)

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npr:

Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, and it may be inhibiting their ability to recognize emotions, according to new research out of the University of California, Los Angeles.
The study, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, found that sixth-graders who went five days without exposure to technology were significantly better at reading human emotions than kids who had regular access to phones, televisions and computers.
The UCLA researchers studied two groups of sixth-graders from a Southern California public school. One group was sent to the Pali Institute, an outdoor education camp in Running Springs, Calif., where the kids had no access to electronic devices. For the other group, it was life as usual.
Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say?
Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

npr:

Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, and it may be inhibiting their ability to recognize emotions, according to new research out of the University of California, Los Angeles.

The study, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, found that sixth-graders who went five days without exposure to technology were significantly better at reading human emotions than kids who had regular access to phones, televisions and computers.

The UCLA researchers studied two groups of sixth-graders from a Southern California public school. One group was sent to the Pali Institute, an outdoor education camp in Running Springs, Calif., where the kids had no access to electronic devices. For the other group, it was life as usual.

Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say?

Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

fluffymb:

The moment when the table turns.

(Source: baahts, via lacigreen)